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                     IT'S THE LAW

                   TABLE OF CONTENTS

                     


                                                
Table of Contents ....................................

The Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities ......

Rights of People with Disabilities ...................

Outline of Rights of People with Disabilities ........
I. Who Has a Disability? .............................
     A. Definition ...................................
     B. Who is Qualified Under the Law? ..............
     C. Individuals Considered to Have a Disability ..

II. Significant Laws Recognizing Rights of People with 
    Disabilities .....................................
     A. Federal ......................................
         1. Rehabilitation Act .......................
         2. Fair Housing Act .........................
         3. Education of the Handicapped Act (EHA) 
         4. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) ....
     B. State ........................................
         1. Human Rights Law .........................
         2. Civil Rights Law .........................
     C. City .........................................
         1. Human Rights Law .........................

III. What Rights Do These Laws Recognize? ............
     A. Employment ...................................
         1. Equal Opportunity ........................
         2. Affirmative Action .......................
     B. Housing ......................................
         1. Federal Fair Housing Act..................
         2. Architectural Accessibility ..............
         3. City and State Human Rights Laws .........
     C. Public Accommodations ........................
         1. Generally ................................
         2. Program Accessibility ....................
         3. Architectural Accessibility...............
         4. Educational Facilities ...................   
	 5. Transportation ...........................
         6. Hospitals ................................
     D. Education ....................................
         1. Generally ................................
         2. Schools as Public Accommodations ........

IV. How Are These Rights Enforced? ...................
     A. Federal Rehabilitation Act....................
         1. Section 503 ..............................
         2. Section 504 ..............................
     B. Federal Fair Housing Act .....................
     C. Federal Education of the Handicapped Act ......
     D. New York State Human Rights Law ...............
     E. New York State Civil Rights Law ...............
     F. New York City Human Rights Law ................
     G. Arbitration and Alternative Dispute Resolution
     H. Which Forum Should You Choose? ................
     I. Attorney's Fees ...............................

Let Us Serve You ......................................

Resource Appendix .....................................         
     General Information and Assistance ...............
     Where to File Complaints .........................
     Legal Assistance .................................                   
     Another Helpful Resource .........................


		     Rights of People With Disabilities
				Summer 1990


THE MAYOR'S OFFICE FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

     The Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities ("MOPD") is the liaison
between City government and the disability community.  MOPD assists City
agencies and the community in efforts to comply with laws recognizing rights
of people with disabilities.  In addition, the Office provides information,
referral and advocacy for people with disabilities.  MOPD advises the Mayor
about legislative initiatives which would benefit the disability community.
Among areas of prime concern are education, employment, housing, as well as
general accessibility to and accommodation of people with disabilities.
These topics are covered in this book.  Additional areas of MOPD's authority
include access to transportation, community-based health and social
services, home care and entitlements.


RIGHTS OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES 
         
     The following outline of rights for people with disabilities in New
York City covers some of the most common areas of concern.  Of course, in a
brief outline such as this, it is not possible to cover, in detail, all
aspects of legal protection.  MOPD will assist people seeking further
information on an individual basis and may be able to provide a speaker for
interested groups.

     City, State and Federal laws recognize a wide variety of rights for people
with disabilities.  Frequently, similar rights are covered by all three
levels of government, providing alternative enforcement mechanisms and
remedies.  Enforcement agencies coordinate their efforts to try to achieve
the best result for people who claim that their rights have been violated.
The Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities is not an enforcement
agency, although we can refer people to such agencies when the less formal
advocacy which we provide does not secure adequate relief.
                                            

OUTLINE OF RIGHTS OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES 

I. Who Has a Disability? 

     A. While definitions vary slightly under different laws, generally,
     people are considered to have a disability if they:

	  1) have a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits 
	  one or more major life activity(ies), such as walking, talking, 
	  seeing, hearing, self care, learning, or working; or

	  2) have a record of having had an impairment such as a history of
	  cancer, or past mental illness; or
 
	  3) are regarded by others as having an impairment, for example, due
	  to a facial scar, limp or positive HIV test.

     B. Laws, particularly those relating to employment, frequently limit
     protection to those considered "qualified".  To be "qualified", a
     person with a disability must be able to perform essential job
     functions (at least with reasonable accommodations by the employer) or
     to enjoy basic aspects of the program or activity (again, with
     reasonable accommodation, if needed).  (What accommodations are
     reasonable generally depend on the circumstances of each situation.)

     C. People with AIDS, ARC, tuberculosis and other infectious conditions
     are considered to have a disability and are protected to the extent
     that their infectiousness does not pose a significant risk of hazard to
     others.  People who abuse alcohol, narcotics and other substances are
     considered to have disabilities, although current abuse which
     interferes with safety, job performance or similar factors would
     deprive them of protection in many cases.

II. Significant Laws Recognizing Rights of People with Disabilities 

     While many laws affect people with disabilities, several are most
     significant in recognizing and providing enforcement for basic human
     rights.

     A. Federal 
          1. Rehabilitation Act 

          2. Fair Housing Act 
          
          3. Education of the Handicapped Act (EHA) 
               [This law is likely to be renamed the 
               Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 
               (IDEA) in the fall of 1990].

          4. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
               [The ADA was signed into law on July 26, 1990, 
               but will not be phased into effect 
               until the beginning of 1992 at the earliest.  
               Thus it will not be discussed in detail here.  
               The ADA is a national recognition of the 
               rights of people with disabilities in employ-
               ment and public accommodations (including 
               transportation and telecommunications).  Laws 
               in New York already recognize virtually all 
               of the rights covered by the ADA.]

     B. State 
          1. Human Rights Law 

          2. Civil Rights Law 

     C. City 
          1. Human Rights Law 


III. What Rights Do These Laws Recognize? 

     A. Employment 

          1. Equal Opportunity 

	  a. Section 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act requires recipients
	  of Federal funds to assure qualified people with disabilities an
	  equal opportunity for employment and participation in the
	  recipients' programs and services.  All phases of employment are
	  covered -- including recruitment, hiring, training opportunities,
	  rates of pay, benefits, promotion, job assignments, layoff and
	  termination.  Recipients may not use employment tests or criteria
	  which are not related to the essential elements of the job or which
	  otherwise tend to screen out qualified people with disabilities.
	  Recipients must make reasonable accommodations to the known
	  disabilities of all qualified employees and job applicants
	  unless providing such accommodations would create an undue hardship
	  for the employer.  What accommodations are reasonable generally
	  depends on the circumstances of each situation, but can include:

               i) making facilities physically accessible; 
          
              ii) job restructuring;
          
             iii) modifying work schedules; 
          
              iv) purchasing or modifying equipment; or
          
               v) providing readers, interpreters or other 
               support services.  

	  Most recipients must designate someone to coordinate their
	  compliance with Sec. 504, establish an internal grievance procedure
	  to address discrimination complaints and take other continuing
	  steps to advise employees of employer obligations under Sec. 504.

	  State and City Human Rights Laws extend equal opportunity
	  protections such as those of Sec. 504 to job applicants and
	  employees of most employers, including those who are not recipients
	  of Federal funds, although appointment of a coordinator and creation
	  of internal grievance procedures are not required.  Unions and
	  employment agencies also are prohibited from discriminating under
	  these State and City laws.  The State Civil Rights Law also
	  prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities who use a
	  guide, hearing or service dog or a cane.  In addition, State Civil
	  Service and Education Laws contain provisions against employment
	  discrimination on the basis of disability, such as in test taking.
     
          2. Affirmative Action 

	  Section 503 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act requires employers
	  with Federal contracts of $2500 or more annually (for services,
	  supplies, use of real property, etc.) to take affirmative action to
	  employ and promote qualified people with disabilities.  Employers
	  of 50 or more and those with Federal contracts of $50,000 or more
	  must have a written affirmative action plan and designate
	  responsible employees to carry it out.  Federal contractors are
	  recipients of Federal funds and thus are covered under Sec. 504 as
	  well.  However, while Sec. 504 generally precludes asking a pro-
	  spective employee whether he or she has a disability (although
	  questions about the ability to perform specific job related
	  functions are permissible), Sec. 503 permits a Federal contractor
	  to ask directly about disabilities, for affirmative action purposes,
	  but only if the questions are properly phrased and confidentiality
	  requirements are met.  The nature and extent of such inquiries are
	  limited by State and City Human Rights Laws.  Federal agencies have
	  affirmative action obligations to their employees under Sec.  501.
	  Amendments to the City Charter passed in 1989 created an Equal
	  Employment Practices Commission to monitor compliance by City
	  agencies with equal employment and affirmative action requirements.


     B. Housing 
          
          1. Federal Fair Housing Act 
          
	  The Federal Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination against
	  people with disabilities or against those residing or associating
	  with people who have disabilities, in the sale or rental of housing
	  accommodations.  Such discrimination also includes refusal to:
                 
               a) permit the person with a disability (at 
               that individual's expense) to make reasonable 
               modifications of the premises which would 
               enable that person to more fully enjoy use of 
               the premises; or
               
               b)make reasonable changes in building rules 
               which changes would enhance the enjoyment of 
               the premises by the person with a disability.
               
          
          2. Architectural Accessibility
 
	  New York City's Building Code, like its State counterpart, requires
	  building owners making renovations to include accessible and
	  adaptable features, leaving tenants who need further adaptations to
	  complete them.  New construction, currently under New York law, and
	  after March 13, 1991, under Federal law, must be accessible/
	  adaptable.  The Federal Architectural Barriers Act requires
	  Federally built, leased or assisted housing to meet certain Federal
	  accessibility standards but, except for providing an alternative
	  remedy, the standards required by this law are less stringent than
	  those under either the Fair Housing Act as of 1991 -- or current
	  State and City Building Codes.  Most pertinent provisions of New
	  York City's Building Code were added by Local Law 58 of 1987.

          
          3. City and State Human Rights Laws

	  City and State Human Rights Laws prohibit discrimination against
	  people with disabilities, much as the Federal Fair Housing Act does.
	  Under New York City's Human Rights Law, a building owner is required
	  to permit (and, in some cases, even to make) changes, such as the
	  installation of hand-rails or a ramp.  The State Civil Rights Law
	  prohibits discrimination in public and private housing solely
	  because a person has both a disability and is accompanied by a
	  guide, hearing or service dog.
 

     C. Public Accommodations 

          1. Generally

	  City and State Human Rights Laws prohibit exclusion of people with
	  disabilities from most public accommodations such as restaurants,
	  hotels, clubs, theatres, recreational facilities and medical
	  clinics.  Architectural changes may be required to promote
	  accessibility under these laws.  State and City Building Codes,
	  State Public Buildings Law and State Trans-portation Law also
	  contain provisions which promote architectural accessibility in
	  places of public accommodation, as well as in other facilities.
                              

          2. Program Accessibility 

	  Section 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act requires that direct
	  and indirect recipients of Federal financial assistance operate
	  programs and services in such a way that, when viewed in their
	  entirety, they are accessible to persons with disabilities.  No
	  person with a disability may be excluded from programs or services
	  of such recipients because the facilities are inaccessible.  New
	  facilities or facilities to be substantially renovated must be
	  made accessible.  Existing facilities must be made accessible
	  eventually, but, until they are, recipients must use alternative
	  methods of providing services and/or access to the program, such as
	  alternative sites, home visits, etc.  Priority in choosing
	  alternative methods must be given to those which provide the
	  greatest possible integration of people with disabilities.
	  Reasonable accommodations must be made to a person's known
	  disabilities to provide the person with meaningful access to the
	  program.

                             
          3. Architectural Accessibility

	  Public buildings built or bought with Federal funds are required to
	  be accessible to people with physical disabilities, as are Federally
	  leased buildings intended for public use or in which people with
	  physical disabilities might be employed, pursuant to the Federal
	  Architectural Barriers Act.  New buildings covered by these laws are
	  to be built in compliance with standards set by the Federal
	  Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board.
	  Buildings are not to be leased (or leases are not to be renewed)
	  unless the buildings comply with those standards and renovations are
	  to be done in accord with those standards.  In addition to the
	  program accessibility requirements described above, the State
	  Public Buildings and Transportation Laws require various public
	  buildings and facilities to be built (or, when existing buildings or
	  facilities are altered, to be altered) so that they are accessible
	  to people with disabilities.


          4. Educational Facilities

	  Public educational facilities are exempt under the State and City
	  Human Rights Laws; however, the State Civil Rights Law bars
	  discrimination there with respect to the use of guide, hearing and
	  service dogs.  Federal Rehabilitation Act Sec. 504 and the Education
	  of the Handicapped Act require accessibility, among other things, in
	  most schools not covered by the State and City Human Rights Laws.
	  Private schools (educational corporations or associations) which are
	  or claim to be non-sectarian or tax-exempt are prohibited from
	  denying people with disabilities use of their facilities under
	  both State and City Human Rights Laws.  The City and State
	  University systems are among colleges and universities covered by
	  these human rights law provisions.
          
  
          5. Transportation

	  State Civil Rights and Transportation Laws require that buses and
	  all other forms of public and private transportation accept guide,
	  hearing and service dogs at no extra charge when accompanying a
	  person with a disability. Air carriers are also prohibited from
	  discriminating against people with disabilities regardless of
	  whether the carrier receives Federal funds.  Moreover, airlines are
	  prohibited from limiting the number of people with disabilities on a
	  flight and from requiring special advance notice (except for special
	  equipment, such as respirators).
     

          6. Hospitals 
          
	  The State Hospital Code requires hospitals to "manage a resource of
	  skilled interpreters and persons skilled in communicating with
	  vision and hearing impaired individuals and ... [to] provide
	  translations/transcriptions of significant hospital forms,
	  instructions and information in order to provide visual, oral and
	  written communication with all persons receiving treatment in the
	  hospital regardless of a patient's language or impairment of hearing
	  or vision....  [I]nterpreters and persons skilled in communicating
	  with vision and/or hearing impaired individuals ...  [must] be
	  available to patients in the inpatient and outpatient setting within
	  twenty minutes and to patients in the emergency service within ten
	  minutes of a request ...."  Treatment is to be provided without
	  discrimination as to disability; patients are to be informed of
	  these rights.


     D. Education 
          
          1. Generally
 
	  The Federal Education of the Handicapped Act (sometimes commonly
	  referred to as P.L. 94-142 or as the EHA -- but soon to be renamed
	  the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)) requires
	  that a free appropriate elementary and secondary education be
	  provided for children with disabilities between ages 5 and 21;
	  preschool programs for children ages 3-5 were added in 1989.
	  Required features include:

               a) programs to identify and evaluate all 
               children with disabilities; 
     
               b) an Individ-ualized Education Program 
               ("IEP") designed to meet the needs of each 
               disabled child in the most integrated setting 
               possible; 

               c) related services (such as transportation, 
               testing, diagnosis and treatment). 

          Parents have the right to: 

               a) be consulted before the school makes a 
               decision about their child; 
     
               b) be involved in the planning of IEPs; 
     
               c) see all records relating to their child's 
               evaluation, placement and education;  
     
               d) object to the school's decision about 
               their child, have a formal hearing about such 
               objections; and 
     
               e) obtain an independent educational 
               evaluation which the school district (for New 
               York City, the Board of Education) will pay 
               for under certain circumstances, such as when 
               the district's professionals are unable to 
               evaluate the child in a timely manner.
                                             
          
          2. Schools as Public Accommodations

	  As discussed more fully under Public Accommodations, although
	  public schools generally are excluded from coverage under public
	  accommodations provisions of State and City Human Rights Laws,
	  protection is provided -- to students, parents, teachers, other
	  employees and others -- by Sec.  504 and (as to people with
	  disabilities who use guide, hearing of service dogs) by the State
	  Civil Rights Law and by a separate provision of the State Human
	  Rights Law.  As described above, private non-sectarian and
	  tax-exempt schools are prohibited from denying use of their
	  facilities to people with disabilities under the State and City
	  Human Rights Laws.  The protections mentioned in this paragraph
	  apply to training programs and post-secondary education (colleges
	  and universities), as well as to elementary and secondary schools.


IV. How Are These Rights Enforced? 

     A. Federal Rehabilitation Act 

          1. Section 503 

            a. Complaint Procedure 

               (1) Discuss complaint with affirmative action 
               officer; or 

               (2) file an internal grievance with the 
               employer; or 

               (3) file complaint with the U.S. Department 
               of Labor Office of Federal Contract Compli-
               ance Programs ("OFCCP"), 201 Varick Street, 
               NYC 10014 ((212) 337-2218) within 180 days of 
               the alleged violation. 

            b. Penalties can include reinstatement of 
            employee, back pay, termination of Federal 
            contracts. 

          2. Section 504 

            a. Complaint Procedure 

               (1) Discuss with Sec. 504 Coordinator; or 

               (2) file an internal grievance (if procedure 
               available); or 

               (3) file Sec. 504 complaint with the Federal 
               agency which funded the program, service (or, 
               where no funding is provided to the particu-
               lar program or service involved, with the 
               Federal agency providing funding to the 
               recipient generally) within 180 days of the 
               alleged violation; or 

               (4) file a private lawsuit. 

            b. Penalties can include reinstatement of 
            employee, back pay, withdrawal of Federal 
            funding, attorney's fee and other relief.
          
     B. Federal Fair Housing Act 

     The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development ("HUD") is
     empowered to attempt conciliation and, failing that, to proceed to
     administrative hearings; either side, however, has the right to bring a
     dispute under the law into Federal court.  Complaints may be filed with
     HUD's Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity Office, Region II, 26 Federal
     Plaza - Room 3532, NYC 10278 ((212) 264-1290).

          1. Complaint Procedures 

            a. Administrative Proceedings - File complaint 
            with HUD within 1 year after alleged discrimina-
            tory housing practice has occurred or ceased. 

            b. Judicial Proceedings 
               (1) If HUD files a charge based on your 
               complaint, but you would prefer judicial 
               action, you may ask HUD to have the U.S. 
               Justice Department file a civil lawsuit on 
               your behalf. 

               (2) File a private lawsuit within 2 years 
               after alleged discriminatory housing practice 
               has occurred or ceased, or after a concilia-
               tion agreement has been violated. 
          
	  2. Penalties may include injunctive relief, money damages, civil
	  fines (up to $50,000 for a first offense; up to $100,000 thereafter)
	  and attorney's fees and costs.  Bona fide sales or leases made
	  before relief is granted will not be disturbed, however.


     C. Federal Education of the Handicapped Act 

     Parents should work with the Committee on Special Education of their
     Community School Board.  If parents need Federal assistance in securing
     their rights under the Education of the Handicapped Act, they should
     contact the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services
     in the U.S. Department of Education, which administers the law with
     help from that Department's Office for Civil Rights, Region II, 26
     Federal Plaza - Room 33130, NYC 10278 ((212) 264-2906) (The U.S.
     Department of Education also handles complaints of discrimination in
     higher education.)

     D. New York State Human Rights Law 

          1. Complaint Procedures 

            a. Administrative Proceedings - File complaint 
            with New York State Division of Human Rights, 
            (see addresses telephone numbers in Appendix) 
            (or with the New York City Division of Human 
            Rights, 52 Duane Street, NYC 10007 ((212) 
            566-5050)) within 1 year of the alleged 
            violation; or 
            
            b. Judicial Proceedings - File a private law-suit. 

          2. Penalties may include reinstatement, back pay, 
          damages or other remedial action.  The State 
          Division may impose fines; failure to comply with 
          State Division orders may be deemed a misdemeanor, 
          carrying an additional fine of between $100 and 
          $500. 
     

     E. New York State Civil Rights Law 

          1. File a private lawsuit. 

          2. Seek enforcement by Attorney General, 163 West 
          125th Street, NYC 10027 (or District Attorney). 

          3. Criminal sanctions may be imposed for viola
          tions. 


     F. New York City Human Rights Law 

	  1. File charge with New York City Commission on Human Rights, 52
	  Duane Street, NYC 10007 ((212) 566-5050) within 1 year of the
	  alleged violation.

	  2. Remedies may include reinstatement, back pay, damages and other
	  remedial action.
 

     G. Arbitration and Alternative Dispute Resolution 

     Some statutes, collective bargaining agreements and other programs
     provide for arbitration or some other alternative dispute resolution
     mechanism which may be faster, easier and less expensive than waiting
     for administrative action or proceeding to a lawsuit.  However, these
     approaches have their limitations as well and should be considered
     carefully in comparison with more traditional procedures.

     H. Which Forum Should You Choose? 

	  1. Whether you choose to file charges with a City, State or Federal
	  government agency, to file a State or Federal lawsuit, or to seek
	  arbitration or some other form of alternative dispute resolution,
	  depends on a variety of factors which may best be weighed in
	  consultation with one of the enforcement agencies or with a private
	  attorney.  Effectiveness, promptness and cost of the various
	  alternatives may be among the factors to explore.

	  2. It is important to decide early whether you want to follow
	  administrative procedures, rather than pursuing private litigation,
	  since pursuit of one course may bar another.  A court may defer to
	  arbitration or to an administrative proceeding when one of these
	  alternatives has been commenced before you go to court; an
	  administrative proceeding may be stopped when you go to trial in
	  court.

 
     I. Attorney's Fees 

     Frequently, people with disabilities, like others seeking legal
     assistance to enforce their rights, do not have the money to pay a
     lawyer.  Fortunately for those with disabilities, many of the laws
     setting forth their rights also provide for the award of attorney's
     fees.  Other statutes and court decisions provide for the award of
     attorney's fees as well.

LET US SERVE YOU    

     The Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities is here to serve you --
     to help you understand your rights, to help others recognize those
     rights and to refer you to appropriate enforcement agencies when
     necessary.  As mentioned earlier, this brief outline cannot cover all
     details nor discuss how these laws may apply to your particular
     situation.  For further information and assistance, call MOPD's
     Information, Referral and Advocacy Unit (IRA) at 52 Chambers Street,
     Room 206, NYC 10007 ((212) 566-3913) (voice and TTY).

RESOURCE APPENDIX


General Information and Assistance 

     New York City Mayor's Office for People with 
     Disabilities 
     52 Chambers Street - Room 206 
     New York, New York  10007 
     (212) 566-3913 (voice/TTY)     
     (212) 566-0972 (voice) 
     (212) 566-0046 (TDD only) 

     New York State Office of the Advocate for the Disabled 
     116 West 32nd Street - 14th Floor 
     New York, New York  10001 
     (212) 502-0877
     (800) 522-4369 (voice/TDD) (Albany - Main Office)     


     New York State Commission on Quality of Care 
     for the Mentally Disabled     
     80 Maiden Lane - Room 320B 
     New York, New York  10038 
     (212) 804-1639 

     Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped 
     The New York Public Library 
     166 Avenue of the Americas 
     New York, New York  10013                    
     (212) 925-1011 

     
Where to File Complaints

Federal Rehabilitation Act
Section 503 (Employment - Federal Contractors)

     Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs
     United States Department of Labor
     201 Varick Street
     New York, New York  10014
     (212) 337-2006


Section 504 (Employment/Programs - Federal Fund Recipients)

File with Federal agency funding the entity about which complaint is being 
made; Federal agencies handling most complaints include:


     United States Department of Education
     Office of Civil Rights
     26 Federal Plaza - Room 33130
     New York, New York  10278
     (212) 264-2906

     United States Department of Health and Human Services
     Office of Civil Rights
     26 Federal Plaza - Room 3312
     New York, New York  10278
     (212) 264-3313

     United States Department of Housing & Urban Development
     Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity
     26 Federal Plaza - Room 3532
     New York, New York 10278
     (212) 264-1290

     United States Department of Labor
     Regional Office of Civil Rights
     201 Varick Street
     New York, New York  10014
     (212) 337-2218


Federal Fair Housing Act

File with the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development,
listed under Sec. 504, above.


Federal Education of the Handicapped Act

File with the United States Department of Education, listed under Sec. 504, 
above.


New York State Human Rights Law

     New York City Commission on Human Rights
     52 Duane Street
     New York, New York  10007
     (212) 566-5050

     New York State Division of Human Rights
     New York City Offices:

       Main Office
       55 West 125th Street
       New York, New York  10027
       (212) 870-8400

       Upper Manhattan & Queens
       State Office Building
       163 West 125th Street
       New York, New York  10027
       (212) 870-8650

       Lower Manhattan
       State Office Building
       270 Broadway, Ninth Floor
       New York, New York  10007
       (212) 587-5041

       Brooklyn & Staten Island
       1360 Fulton Street
       Brooklyn, New York  11216
       (718) 622-4600


New York State Civil Rights Law

     New York State Attorney General
     163 West 125th Street
     New York, New York  10027
     (212) 870-4475


New York City Human Rights Law

     New York City Commission on Human Rights
     52 Duane Street
     New York, New York  10007
     (212) 566-5050


Legal Assistance

(Note: Several of these agencies have multiple offices; only main offices are
listed below.  Most agencies listed below can only assist people with low
incomes.  Offices which are most involved in providing legal services to
people with disabilities are indicated in bold letters).

     Bronx Legal Services 
     579 Courtlandt Avenue 
     Bronx, New York  10451 
     (212) 993-6250 

     Brooklyn Legal Services Corporation "A" 
     260 Broadway 
     Brooklyn, New York  11211 
     (718) 782-6195 

     Brooklyn Legal Services Corporation "B" 
     105 Court Street - 3rd Floor 
     Brooklyn, New York  11201 
     (718) 237-5500 

     Gay Men's Health Crisis, Inc.
     129 West 20th Street
     New York, New York  10011
     (212) 337-3504

     Harlem Legal Services, Inc.
     144 West 125th Street
     New York, New York  10027
     (212) 222-7800

     Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund, Inc.
     666 Broadway - 12th Floor
     New York, New York  10012
     (212) 995-8585

     Legal Action Center of the City of New York
     153 Waverly Place
     New York, New York  10014
     (212) 243-1313

     Legal Aid Society
     Civil Legal Assistance Information
     11 Park Place
     New York, New York  10007
     (212) 227-2755
     
     Legal Services for New York City
     (formerly Community Action for Legal Services (CALS)) 
     350 Broadway 
     New York, New York  10013 
     (212) 431-7200 

     MFY Legal Services, Inc.
     41 Avenue A
     New York, New York  10009
     (212) 475-8000 

     New York Lawyers for the Public Interest, Inc. 
     135 East 15th Street 
     New York, New York  10003 
     (212) 777-7707 

     Queens Legal Services Corporation 
     89-02 Sutphin Boulevard 
     Jamaica, New York  11435 
     (718) 657-8611 

Legal Referral Service 

     Legal Referral Service 
     The Association of the Bar of the City of New York 
     42 West 44th Street 
     New York, New York  10036 
     (212) 382-6625 (voice)/(212) 768-1466 (TDD) 

  Law School Clinics
     
     BLS Legal Services Corporation 
     Federal Litigation Program 
     Brooklyn Law School 
     One Boerum Place 
     Brooklyn, New York  11201 
     (718) 780-7994 

     Bet Tzedek Legal Clinic
     Cardozo School of Law
     The Brookdale Center
     55 Fifth Avenue
     New York, New York  10003
     (212) 790-o240

     Federal Litigation Clinic 
     New York Law School 
     57 Worth Street 
     New York, New York  10013 
     (212) 431-2312 


Another Helpful Reference

     Rights of People with Disabilities    
     The Association of the Bar of the City of New York
     42 West 44th Street
     New York, N.Y. 10036
     (212) 382-6600

     
Prepared by:
Mark H. Leeds, Counsel 
Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities 
With assistance on the 1990 edition from Kathe A. Newman 


        

 

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